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Ken Scharabok
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 6:22 am:   Edit Post

This is just intended as a rough guide for identifying anvils which are not clearly marked. For more detail information see Anvil's in America by Richard Postman (and More on Anvils when it is published):

- If there is an oval depression in the bottom it may be either a Trenton. Arm & Hammer or Swedish. If there is a clear line/seam showning a top plate it would likely be a Trenton or Arm & Hammer. If the area under the heel is rough worked, it would likely be a Arm & Hammer. No seam, then I would suspect a one-piece cast Swedish.

- If there is an hourglass shaped depression on the bottom it is likely a Hay-Budden (with the exception of some manufacturer put out 50 pounders with a hourglass depression also).

- If you see a series of numbers (serial number) on the front foot, it is almost certainly to be a Trenton, Hay-Budden or Arm & Hammer. If it starts with an A, it would be an H-B. Arm & Hammers do not go over about 52,000.

- If it meets the other criteria for one of the above, and it has no serial number, it may be one of their rejects sold on the secondary market. Usually, but not always, it was due to an incomplete weld between the anvil and top plate. When they tested it, they didn't get the 'ring' all over the plate they wanted.

- If you see numbers at the waist such as 1 1 20, it is a British made anvil. This is their stone weight system to where the first number represents multiples of 112 (1/20th a long ton), second represents multiples of 28 and third is remaining pounds. Thus this would be 160 pounds (112 plus 28 times two plus 20). Usually off from scale weight a tad.

- If you see punch marks between the numbers, such as 1 . 1 . 20, it is likely a Mousehole. Sometimes all which remains are the two punch marks.

- If there are small, flat steps on top of the front and back feet it is almost certain to be an English Peter Wright.

- If it has five handling holes, with two on the front and back feet, it is almost certain to be an English Peter Wright.

- If it is the London pattern (what you would typically consider an anvil to look like) and there is no seam between the body and top plate, it may be Swedish one-piece cast steel. (However, anvil makers were sometimes very, very good at working in the seam.)

- American British and Continental Europe manufacturers made double-horned anvils, and specialty anvils, such as saw maker, carriage or plowshare anvils, so these are of little help by themselves.

- If you see what looks to be an Eagle on the side, it is almost certain to be a Fisher Norris. Eagle is usually holding an anchor, perhaps because Fisher made many of the big ship and shipyard anvils for the U.S. Navy. Largest anvil every known to have been made (1,400 pounds) is a Fisher.

- If you see what looks to be an arm holding a hammer on the side it could be either Vulcan or Arm & Hammer. Vulcans were raised while Arm & hammer's were stamped in. Vulcans tended to be short and blockly while A&Hs were more sleek looking.

- If the anvil has no 'ring' when struck, it is likely a cast iron body with steel plate on top. (These were sometimes called 'city anvils'.) Likely either Vulcan or Fisher. Vuncans tended to be more blocky while Fisher's were more typically of the sleeker London pattern. Older Fishers had a handling hole under the horn and heel also, while Vulcan's didn't, and newer Fishers (after the late 1800s) usually had the mold pattern date under the heel.

If you see what looks to be II&B on the front foot it would be a Vulcan (Illinois Iron and Bolt Co). Some people incorrectly think this is H&B for Hay-Budden.

- If you see what looks to be a relief of a Badger within an oval, it would be a Badger (American Skein and Foundry Co. of Racine, WI). If for sale snatch it up at almost any reasonable price as this would be a very, very rare anvil. The other American anvil considered to be rare is the Samson. After the manufacturing of Trentons moved to Cleveland, OH, one of the former owners continued to make anvils in Trenton, NJ calling them Samsons.

- If the anvil has a very narrow waist and an 'oversized' horn, likely it is one of the newer farrier anvils. These are all one piece cast steel to my knowledge.

- On aging, steps came into common use on American and British anvils about 1780. Pritchel (punching) holes about 1830. (However, some older anvils had pritchels later drilled into them.)

Any anvil with letters, numbers or logos raised, would have been at least partially cast. In the latter years of manufacturing the American wrought iron anvil makers used cast bases rather than forging them out. Sometimes the base doesn't match the top, such as a 140 pound base used for a 160 pound top.

Raised weight markings were pretty well only on cast anvils (or cast bases) and usually had the last digit left off, such as 8 representing 80 pounds or 16 representing 160 pounds.

Anvils were usually marked on the side with the horn to the right, under the horn and on the front foot. Wirebrush using soap and water to base metal. Let thoroughly dry. Lay on side and dust with flour. Brush off, leaving flour in depressions. Do same with front foot with anvil resting on heel. Sometimes lettering or numbers just jump out at you.

If you see a 'painted lady' (a painted anvil) and it meets some of the above criteria, you might take a chance on it. However, be aware a coat of paint can hide a multitude of sins and it can still turn out to be a 'prostitute', rather than a 'good woman'. Many of the new imported anvils are painted. Personally I would not be interested in an anvil with a painted top plate as there may well be body putty under it.

If you can make out any markings you can contact me at my e-mail address as I may be able to help you identify it. A good photograph (with flour in depressions) goes a long way.
Ken Scharabok
Posted on Wednesday, December 15, 2004 - 5:38 am:   Edit Post

It has been pointed out to me some early Trentons also had the hourglass depression on the bottom. These also had flat top front and back feet, but wide ones, not a small ledge as with P-W.

Trenton, Hay-Budden and Arm & Hammer (as well as the British firms) made anvils using the buyer's logo. For example, Acme (Sears) and Lakeside (Montgomery Ward) anvils were made by both Trenton and Hay-Budden. If it has a serial number on the front foot the anvil was almost certainly made by one of these three. You then have to look at secondary characteristics.

E-mail addys are not given in message. Just clink on my name for the form.
Glen Dunahoo
Posted on Wednesday, August 10, 2005 - 4:17 pm:   Edit Post

I have found a serial number of 1294xx on the front foot. Also on the left side there appears to be a number 19. Coould this possibly be the weight?
Ken Scharabok
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 6:46 am:   Edit Post

I have asked Richard Postman about this in the past. Apparently if it is related to weight it is more a coincidence than design. Some anvil manufacturers left off the last digit of the weight, such as Fishers perhaps having a 16 on one foot for 160-pounds or Vulcans perhaps having a 7 under the horn for 70 pounds. He suspects they may be the stamps for perhaps anvil makers (the crew), inspectors or material batch number.
Jeremiah Tomlinson
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 9:54 am:   Edit Post

I recently purchased an anvil from a junk shop and have concluded that it is a Trenton because of the diamond shaped mark on the side of the body. The length of the anvil from horn tip to tail is about 33" and it has a large horn and narrow face. It weighs around 160 pounds (bathroom scale) and has the following numbers on the front face of the foot under the horn: 159 179484 I was wondering if anyone could tell me anything else about it.
Ken Scharabok
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 3:11 pm:   Edit Post

First set of numbers is the weight (which is usually off from scale weight a couple of pounds). Second is serial number and indicates it was manufactured in 1921. Columbia (OH) Forging and Iron produced some 225,500 anvils between 1898 and 1954. Perhaps more than that amount since there are some with a serial number starting with an A which don't seem to fit their serial number list. Those may have been made for them by a subcontractor and the A used to indicate that. Somewhat speculation on my part since the Columbia (OH) Anvil and Forging Co. (manufacturers of the Arm & Hammer brand anvil) was nearby - so A might indicate those subcontracted to them.
Jeremiah Tomlinson
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 10:18 pm:   Edit Post

Thank you.
What were the clips on the horns used for??
Ken Scharabok
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 9:29 am:   Edit Post

Sound like it was a farrier's anvil. They were used to put clips on the end of horseshoes. I have not seen them used, so don't know exactly how. If you run across a farrier, ask them.
SCOTT
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 2:42 pm:   Edit Post

I have a fisher and norris anvil believe. it has the eagle holding the anchor and 908 under the heel the other marks are SHER impressed into the base side under the horn it has one handling hole slightly off center to the horn and another off center under the heel .
could the SHER be for phil sheridan of civil war union calvery?
Nathan
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 9:11 pm:   Edit Post

It could also be the last four letters of FISHER.

The clips are used to put clips exatcly as Ken said. They are done by putting the hot steel right against the sharp edge and as it is up a tad bit it is struck pulling the metal back over the clip. Quite hard to describe without showing it.
Ken Scharabok
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 9:36 am:   Edit Post

Scott: Definitely a Fisher Norris anvil. The numbers under the heel would be 1908. Actually year mold was made, but casting date should be either 1908 or 1909. I have been told molds were replaced on a regular basis to maintain quality of casting.

Some Fishers do not have the eagle and anchor logo. Story goes after the Civil War there was a large demand for anvils in the South for the reconstruction effort. While Fisher pretty well dominated the American-made anvil market at the time, they didn't sell well there. Belief was Southerns associated the eagle with the still detested Northern (federal) government. Once logo was removed, they sold. Some Fishers were also produced with an Eagle Anvil Works decal with no further identification. Reason is unknown and may or may not be related to the above 'story'.

A common problem with wrought iron base/steel plate anvils was the compression of the wrought iron in the middle of the anvil due to heavy use, creating a 'saddle'. Fishers, being cast iron bodied, didn't have that problem. Also they used their not ringing in their advertisements as well. This type anvil was sometimes called either dead or a city anvil, as it could be used in a urban setting.

I have run into some who have insisted the anvils were made in Mexico as the eagle/anchor logo looks much like the back of some older Mexican coins.

My personal anvil is a 160-lb Fisher (1912 I think) and I wouldn't trade it for another.
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Todd (New2anvils)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 10:30 pm:   Edit Post

I was wondering if anyone could give me some history or anything else on this anvil I have come across. First, it was owned by my wifes grandfather. On the side there is a diamond shape and all I can read is nton. I think maybe it is a trenton. below that it reads "Solid Wrought" in a circle and below that reads 162 near the bottom. Which i beleive is the weight (it weighs around 161 on a bathroom scale). It has and hour glass shape bottom and has the number 2 stamped on the front foot. It has Two holes through the top, round and square. I don't know much about anvils, but like I said, it was my wifes grandfathers anvil. I'd like to know anything about it. Thank you.
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:24 am:   Edit Post

Yes, you have a TRENTON. However, there are two different TRENTONs anvil brands.

The first was imported from Europe by Hermann Boker, who was a broker/agent (and perhaps even part owners) of the Trenton (NJ) Vise & Tools Works. He imported anvils under the Trenton name from both Germany and England. Your's sounds like one imported from Germany. The ones imported from England were likely produced by either Peter or Henry Wright, likely have the SOLID WROUGHT in a circle and have the small flats on top of the front and back feet.

Sometime in the very late 1800s anvils started to be manufactured by the Columbus (OH) Forge & Iron Works. Hermann Boker became an agent for them and likely sold the Trenton anvil brand name to them. For CF&I manufacturing an anvil brand with an existing, and excellent, reputation was far superior to breaking into the market with their own brand name. Had they not used Trenton, likely their anvils would have been named Indian Chief or Buel (after one of the founders).

CF&I Trentons normally have the weight to the left side of the front foot and a serial number to the right.

Thus, your anvil likely dates prior to about 1898, perhaps back to the 1860s. The body is two sections of wrought iron with a steel plate on top.

On value, these 'German' Trentons aren't really any different than CF&I ones. If in excellent conditions I would say roughly $3.00 pound.

The square hole on top is called a hardy hole. Near as I can tell it comes from 'hardy' meaning 'robust'. The round one is called a pritchel (or punching) hole. Near as I can tell pritchel is derived from pritch/prick, a shaft used to punch holes in the ground in which to plant seeds.
Anonymous
 
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post

Mousehole?

I need help dating this anvil. Punch marks between numbers indicate Mousehole Forge. No other markings visable.
Thanks

Mousehole 1Mousehole 2Mousehole 3Mousehole FeetMousehole Horn
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Post Number: 152
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Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 2:56 pm:   Edit Post

According to Anvils in America, pages 69-71, you more likely have an M. Reading, but it could be another manufacturer. The style and lack of a pritchel hole date it prior to 1780, and perhaps even to the late 1600s or early 1700s. Note how the latters were first put in via punch marks and then a chisel used to connect them.

While it looks like one piece, more likely it is 8-9. They would start by stacking up wrought iron scrap to form a block via forge welding all of the pieces together. Then, to it, would have been forge welded the four feet, heel and horn. Top plate of tool steel is likely two pieces.

Style and date have become to be known as a Colonial English anvil.
Michael Graf (Ghs)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 3:31 pm:   Edit Post

I just picked up this anvil.
I haven't weighed it yet, but the two of us it took to put it into the pickup think 300# would be a good guess.
The footprint is hour glass shape, The feet show no ledge like a PW would have.

The only identifying marks that I have been able to pick out are what seems to be the number 298(? or maybe 6) located on the foot horn end left . and a depression in the base which is shaped like a cylinder cut lengthwise . This depression is about 1 inch deep and comes to within 1 inch off all the edges.

The anvil is for sure two different metals.
The base and horn spark low carbon. The face is definately a tool steel. The sides look forged, but it may just be use marks.Someone used the sides to test tooling.
Michael Graf (Ghs)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 4:16 pm:   Edit Post

you can not see it in the photo but it does have a pritchel hole.

Viewed from the top standing with the horn facing you the pritchel hole is at the 11 oclock position relative to the hardy hole.
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 6:33 pm:   Edit Post

Sounds like a Hay-Budden. Serial number indicates early production, perhaps 1892. Earliest ones may have been wrought iron top and bases. Later may have been a combination of wrought iron top and mild steel bases. In 1908 they went with a forged top out of tool steel with a mild steel base.

Logo would have been HAY-BUDDEN arched over MANUFACTURING CO. with BROOKLYN, NY arched under it. Weight would have been at waist.

However, Hay-Budden made a number of anvils for clients using their markings.
Ray Hinnant (Raysrust)
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Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2007 - 6:04 pm:   Edit Post

I recently acquired a Lakeside 100lb (on my scale) anvil. The numbers on the foot that I can read are 0(?)2345. There may be another number to the left, but I am not sure. Is this a very early anvil? How can I tell if it is a trenton or Hay Budden?
Mark Schneider (Dancingotter)
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Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 10:35 am:   Edit Post

I was wondering if anybody could help identify this anvil. I know it is a sawyers anvil, but I would like to figure out who the manufacturer is.

I believe it was originally purchased by a saw mill in the Indianapolis area around the turn of the century. I purchased it about 20 years ago from a gentleman who retired from that saw mill when they closed operations in Indiana around the 70s- early 80s. He said that he spent his whole career using the anvil to straighten saw blades and that it had been there long before he started. He indicated that he thought the company acquired it around the turn of the century.

I can find no markings on the anvil at all, however there seems to be a bit of a round or oval raised spot on one side where a logo might be, but I cannot make anything out. Weight wise it is well over 300 pounds. It appears to be a cast body with a steel face. The face is extremely hard and has great rebound. In fact it is so hard you can drive a chisel onto it and all that will happen is you flatten the chisel. There also appears to be some remnants of industrial green pain on the feet, but that could have been applied at any time.

You can see photos of the anvil here:
http://www.ottersden.com/g2/main.php?g2_itemId=20


Thanks,
Mark
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post

I can only make a bit of an educated guess as Fisher & Norris, Trenton, NY. Appears to be a cast iron body with a tool steel plate. They, and Illinois Iron & Bolt of Carpentersville, IN (VULCAN brand), would of had the capacity to make one this large, but II&B tended not to make much over 200 pounds. Might have been someone else, but these were the two gorillas of that method of anvil manufacturing.

Fisher's logo was an eagle holding an anchor. Vulcan's was an oval with a raised arm holding a hammer. Cannot make out your area enough to tell.

Indented base may have been either of them. Indent was so anvil set on its edges rather than needed to be perfectly flat on the bottom.

How the steel plate was attached is a matter of speculation. Here an educated guess is they heated the top plate to forge welding temperature, dropped it into some type of holder, set a two-part mold over it, threw in a quantity of flux and then quickly poured in molten cast iron. This might have taken only a matter of seconds for an experienced anvil crew once the top plate was up to temperature. Anvil would have been allowed to cool on its own, removed from mold and then grounded/machined to finish.

Neither Richard Postman (author of Anvils in America) nor I have been unable to make contaact with anyone who worked for II&B or Fisher & Norris to try to confirm the process. If you go to the forum on Blacksmith History and Lore, in the entry under the one on the Fisher & Norris Anvil Works it notes they wouldn't even let strangers into their plant to see how they made their anvils.
Mark Schneider (Dancingotter)
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Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 12:57 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks for the info. I have wondered in the past if it might be a Fisher, but I was under the impression that they stamped or cast thier name into the anvil foot.
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Friday, May 25, 2007 - 1:38 am:   Edit Post

Fisher & Norris typically had FISHER somewhere on the anvil, but it wasn't an absolute.

Some Fishers also don't have their eagle. Most of these date post Civil War to about the 1880s. Story goes after the Civil War Fisher was having trouble marketing their anvils in the South. Thought was Southerners associated the eagle with the detested federal government.

From about 1843 to the late 1880s Fisher & Norris was pretty well THE only significant anvil manufacturer in the U.S.
MrSmith (Mrsmith)
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Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2007 - 7:46 am:   Edit Post

http://www.beautifuliron.com/gs_anvils.htm
here is the Anvil Distributors & Importers for the United States
Anders Merikallio (Aape)
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Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2007 - 12:55 pm:   Edit Post

Hello eveyone! I need help identifying an old anvil. This is located in Finland, and it has a "DB" or something like that stamped to its side. I hope the images will help.

One blacksmith said it could be British origin. It has been used by a farrier.

Thanks in advance!

anvilanvil2
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007 - 8:02 am:   Edit Post

I doubt it is British. Wrong style of feet and logo. If one piece cast-steel it could have come out of any number of Scandanian foundries. What does bottom look like?
Anders Merikallio (Aape)
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Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007 - 1:59 pm:   Edit Post

I haven't took the stand off yet. Ive seen at least three anvils marked with the same stamp here in southwest Finland. Found no information from the net. Some old man who was selling his fathers anvil with same stamp (at high price), thought it could be german origin. His father was also a farrier. This one I got from my neighbour, its my first anvil and I would like to know who made it.

I will take more images soon. Thanks for the answer!
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Saturday, October 20, 2007 - 6:35 am:   Edit Post

Base does look very much like a 'German' TRENTON anvil. Hermann Boker was a broker for the Trenton Vise and Tool Works of Trenton, NJ. Apparently before going to work for TV&TW he initially had anvils made somewhere (perhaps Germany) which are stamped: H. BOKER. Under TV&TW he then imported anvils from both England (probably made by Peter Wright) and Germany (unknown source) stamped with TRENTON. Far as I know all of these had wrought iron bodies with steel plates.

(Boker is a well-known Germany manufacturer of edged tools - plus probably more.)

If anvil is cast steel, I still suspect Sweden (or at least a Scandanian foundry). If it has a steel plate, then Germany would be a good possibility.
Anders Merikallio (Aape)
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Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - 4:53 pm:   Edit Post

Here is more images. Looks like cast steel. I read one finnish knive-forum and someone thought "DB" could mean "Dalsbruk", which was old Foundry/Metal factory in southwest Finland. Nothing sure about these. The word "bruk" is swedish word meaning something like "Ironworks/metal making/foundry", dont know english word to describe it.




Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - 4:56 pm:   Edit Post

Wire brush the left side of the front foot. Appears to be some lettering there.
Calvin Duke (Duke1)
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Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2007 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post

What would be the best way to remove rust to reveal maunfacturer markings on an anvil? Where would be the best spot to work to find them? I don't want to damage/destroy any, but I also don't want to spend a lot of elbow grease.

I have at my disposal an electric non belt sander and an angle grinder, but I am worried about destroying historical value. It is a london pattern with a cutting ledge about 1 inch lower than the face. The cutting area is much softer than the face with no visible weld seam. I'm sure it is over 100 years old and purchased in England. I'll upload pictures when I've got the marks uncovered.
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
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Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2007 - 5:42 pm:   Edit Post

I recommend using a mix of soapy water and wire brushing by hand. Then thoroughly wash, let completely dry and perhaps give it a spray of something like WD-40 with a rag wiping. I doubt you have anything particularly rear so it is unlikely to affect the anvil's value to remove the rust. The predominant areas for stampings was on the side with horn to right and the front foot. Occasionally English manufacturers put the stone weight stamps on the opposite side of the logo. Please let us know what you find.
joebagadonuts (Davey)
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Posted on Friday, October 26, 2007 - 4:34 pm:   Edit Post

Use Naval Jelly to remove rust. Probably been around for many decades.
Jeff Permis (Tecnovist)
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Posted on Friday, October 26, 2007 - 8:07 pm:   Edit Post

Can you tell me more about Use Naval Jelly Please ---Like who makes it, is there a link to who sells it .Or what is it made from... Thanks
Anders Merikallio (Aape)
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Posted on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 1:21 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks again Ken, I think I solved the manufacturer. I found old "Taalintehdas" brochure, and the logo is very much the same as in my anvil.
Chuck Trout (Ice_czar)
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Posted on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 11:11 pm:   Edit Post

>>>>"Can you tell me more about Use Naval Jelly Please ---Like who makes it, is there a link to who sells it .Or what is it made from... Thanks"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid
Phosphoric acid may be used by direct application to rusted iron, steel tools or surfaces to convert iron(III) oxide (rust) to a water soluble phosphate compound. It is usually available as a greenish liquid, suitable for dipping (acid bath), but is more generally used as a component in a gel, commonly called naval jelly. As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces. Care must be taken to avoid acid burns of the skin and especially the eyes, but the residue is easily diluted with water. When sufficiently diluted it can even be nutritious to plant life, containing the essential nutrients phosphorus and iron. It is sometimes sold under other names, such as "rust remover" or "rust killer"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrochloric_acid
Pickling of steel

Pickling is an essential step in metal surface treatment, to remove rust or iron oxide scale from iron or steel before subsequent processing, such as extrusion, rolling, galvanizing, and other techniques. Technical-quality HCl at typically 18% concentration is the most commonly-used pickling agent for the pickling of carbon steel grades.

Fe2O3 + Fe + 6 HCl → 3 FeCl2 + 3 H2O

The spent acid has long been re-used as ferrous chloride solutions, but high heavy-metal levels in the pickling liquor has decreased this practice.

In recent years, the steel pickling industry has however developed hydrochloric acid regeneration processes, such as the spray roaster or the fluidized bed HCl regeneration process, which allow the recovery of HCl from spent pickling liquor. The most common regeneration process is the pyrohydrolysis process, applying the following formula:

4 FeCl2 + 4 H2O + O2 → 8 HCl+ 2 Fe2O3

By recuperation of the spent acid, a closed acid loop is established. The ferric oxide by product of the regeneration process is a valuable by-product, used in a variety of secondary industries.

HCl is not a common pickling agent for stainless steel grades.
David Miller (Dlmiller90)
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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post

Hi - first time poster.

I picked up an anvil marked on the front foot k166 and A77072. The K is crooked and may not be associated with the 166. It has an hourglass depression in the bottom.

This is a farriers anvil with the upsetting bulge on the horn and 2 pritchel holes.

The quick and dirty ID guide would make this a Hay Budden (hourglass depression and serial number starting with A), but there is a very poorly visible diamond on the side which is reminiscent of a Trenton logo. Just cannot tell from the logo what it really says, but it is diamond shaped.

Any ideas on manufacturer? Did HB job their anvils out to others that had a diamond logo?

Thanks

Anvil serial #anvil logo
Joe Hehner (Hammerstheman)
New member
Username: Hammerstheman

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 11:29 pm:   Edit Post

Hey y'all, I bought an anvil quite awhile back and have just got around to messing with it. I've toyed with the idea of repairing it but I'm curious if it's worth more "as is". I've cleaned and searched it thoroughly and have only found the stone weight on the side. It reads 1 2 10 on the side. It weighs 175lbs and has no step. It has a decent horn but the top plate near the heel is missing. It's of wrought iron make as the top is slightly swayed. It has no name or numbers other than the hundredweight on the side. It's 11" tall with a base 11"W X 11 1/2"L. The face is 5 1/4"W X 12 1/2"L. After reading the postings it somewhat resembles the Colonial English Anvil. Underneath the missing plate at the heel it appears to have had pins to hold the plate to the body. Now I'm not sure if the pritchel hole is really a "real" pritchel hole or a missing pin. Any help you can give would be much appreciated. Thank you. missing top plate at heel
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
New member
Username: Ken_scharabok

Post Number: 295
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 3:54 am:   Edit Post

David: It would be an early Trenton, about 1908. Early ones had the hour-glass depression also. No one knows what the A in from of some of their serial numbers means. Richard Postman doesn't mention the A in Anvil in America for Trenton since they were intersperced with their regular serial numbers. Obviously meant something at the time. If you would, feel under the heel. Is it smooth or somewhat bumpy?

Joe: Just an old English anvil dating after 1820. Could be any manufacturer, but Mouse Hole is the most likely. I doubt those pins were original. Probably someone tried to save a loose plate but drilling through it and then plug welding. No real value. You can pad weld up the heel area, perhaps using 7018 rod (hammered flat after each pass) and then hard facing rod only on the last layers. To keep the hardy hole square find a piece of aluminum just large and forge it into a taper. Jamb into hardy hole and then weld around it as weld will not stick to the aluminum. Same, if possible, for the pritchel hole. If not, you can redrill hole from bottom through the repair (but be prepared for some chipping). Personally I would heat up the area around the pritchel hole and use a drift to round it back out. Top swelling can be ground off.
Joe Hehner (Hammerstheman)
New member
Username: Hammerstheman

Post Number: 2
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 7:56 am:   Edit Post

Thanks alot Ken, I guess I'll just repair it and use it for myself.
Dude Lovell (Olddude)
New member
Username: Olddude

Post Number: 1
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Friday, May 22, 2009 - 6:36 pm:   Edit Post

I have a old anvil. One end looks to be broken off. Very heavy. Only marks I can make is numbers. One of the numbers look to be a 1. Then there is a large space and you can see what looks like a 0 (zero) then another gap and the numbers 15. I tried the flour and could not get a good picture. I am posting what pictures I have.
Pat Roy (Big_rock_forge)
New member
Username: Big_rock_forge

Post Number: 51
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, May 25, 2009 - 6:31 pm:   Edit Post

Right Olddude, looks like one end is gone, and the table looks pretty sad. If you drill a hole through it, it might make a decent anchor, depending on the size of your boat. Probably too big for a door stop.
Ken Scharabok (Ken_scharabok)
New member
Username: Ken_scharabok

Post Number: 347
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 - 1:46 pm:   Edit Post

Dude: I can't get pictures to open, but from description like an early to mid-1800s English anvil. Many of these started out with a core block onto which was forge welding on the feet, horn and heel. If a poor forge weld, heel likely broke off under heavy use - to a 'gosh darn I wish that hadn't happened' from the blacksmith. At one time there were firms in the US to which a damaged anvil could be sent to be repaired.

Much of what is done with a hardy and pritchel can be done using tooling held in a vise.
Ray Waldo (Radius)
New member
Username: Radius

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2010
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 9:37 pm:   Edit Post

Have an anvil I am helping identify for a friend, who thinks its worth its weight in gold, because it "came on the ship with Columbus". I know, really, however I think he believes that.

London pattern, no makers mark(s), only the numbers on the front edge of the foot, "103" on the left, "499582" on the right. I know the 103 is the weight, and from the top of the forum I think that perhaps it is a Trenton. There is also a seam which runs around the perimeter of the horn. The capsule shaped depression on the bottom might be considered an oval.

If anyone can shed any further light on this anvil, with the little information I have provided, I would very much appreciate it.

Thanks much,
Ray~
james hammond (Snoops47)
New member
Username: Snoops47

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2013
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 6:33 pm:   Edit Post

i have an anvil armitage wolff hole with some numbers and letters that looks like va4
d h (D0n)
New member
Username: D0n

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2014
Posted on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post

Any idea what this anvil is. weighs roughly 250 lbs (as weighed on a deer scale). Dimensions are 31.5" x 4.75" x 12". The base is 11 wide x 12 long. The top is very flat and in decent condition. Included are 2 pieces... an upper anvil and a curved object that I believe go with the main anvil.
d h (D0n)
New member
Username: D0n

Post Number: 2
Registered: 6-2014
Posted on Friday, June 27, 2014 - 10:55 am:   Edit Post

anyone?

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